Some Songwriting Thoughts

Here’s a half-baked theory about songwriting from a songwriter.

It’s kind of a pity, but it seems that the best songs come out of the most depressing times. And when you’re joyful and in love with God or life or a person, the songs feel cheesy. So I was figuring out why that is and came to this.

I think this is because storms are personal. We have our individual weaknesses and pains, and so our ways of communicating them are unique, too. And that’s why when you hear that song of struggle that you can relate to on another level, it’s like finding gold.

Meanwhile, love is proven to be a universal, not-so-unique feeling. (Seriously, there have been studies done on the feeling of love.) And that’s not a bad thing. It’s actually good, because if our feelings of love were as unique as our pain, how could we rejoice in it together as a human race, in romances or friendships? Or as a body of believers? Love is about togetherness.

So why are storms individual? It’d seem that pain should be the most relatable for our own sakes. But I think it’s for the simple reason they’e meant to draw us to God. People can help and relate to a point, but God understands and knows fully. Storms and valleys, then, make us rely solely on God, preventing us from being pridefully self-sufficient. Love binds us together and to God in beautiful joy. The oneness we’re created to have.

Let me know what you think about this and correct me and help me get to a fully-baked answer. I know this probably isn’t a perfect concept and I may be wrong, but that’s just my ponderings tonight. :)

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